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Field Trips

 

The Club has monthly field trips from September through May.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - First Landing State Park - 11/12/11

Members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club visited First Landing State Park on November 12, 2011 for our club field trip.  Participants included leader Marc Nichols, Tom Charlock, Libby Carmines, Stuart Sweetman, Jane Frigo, Laura and Brent Slaughter, Virginia and George Boyles, and Marilyn and John Adair.  The group concentrated the morning of the 62nd Street entrance and boat landing but stopped by the beach side before returning to the Peninsula.  Ducks were still scare but several Horned Grebes were a treat.  A complete species of 46 species follows. Report by Jane Frigo

Brown-headed Nuthatch
Common Loon
Eastern Bluebird
Northern Flicker
American Robin
Fish Crow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
American Crow
European Starlings
Blue Jay
Canada Goose
American Goldfinch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Towhee

Carolina Wren
Tundrw Swan
Pileated Woodpecker
Great Blue Heron
Ring-billed Gull
Laughing Gull
Herring Gull
Bufflehead
Osprey
House Wren
Turkey Vulture
Carolina Chickadee
Double Crested Cormorant
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Winter Wren

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Cedar Waxwing
Brown Pelican
Coopers Hawk
Golden Crown Kinglet
Pied-billed Grebe
Greater Black-backed Gull
Horned Grebe
Forster's Tern
Mourning Dove
Royal Tern
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-tailed Hawk
Great Egret
Sanderling

 

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Eastern Shore - 10/15/11

On October 15 the Hampton Road Bird Club visited southern end of the Eastern Shore
starting with the Kiptopeke banding station and traveling to the Oyster
landfill, Oyster inlet, Magotha Rd, Ramp Rd, and finishing at Island #1.   The
banding station was very active and gave us great views of many warbler
species such as Tennessee, Nashville, Cape May, Palm, Magnolia and
Yellow-breasted Chat.  The landfill afforded nice looks at Black-crowned  Night-Herons
(both immature & adult), Little Blue Herons (both immature  & adult) and
several waterfowl including Pied-billed Grebe, American Wigeon,  Ruddy Ducks,
American Black Ducks and Coots.  Hundreds of Tree Swallows  were swirling at
the landfill and Oyster inlet.  One of the last birds we  found was an
immature Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at Island #1.  A truly  great day of
birding. Report by Dave Youker

 

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Blackwater Ecologic al Preserve - 4/16/11

On April 16th, we conducted our monthly field trip the Blackwater Ecological Preserve in the Isle of Wight County.  Members included:  Jane Frigo, Brent & Laura Slaughter, Richard & Barbara Hudgins, Mel Pettard, Robin McLeod, Stuart Sweetman, George & Virginia Boyles, Dot Silsby, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, Nick Flanders, and Dave Youker.  The threatening storms held off and we had a 10-warbler day which included:  Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped, Yellow-throated,  Pine, Prairie, Black-and-white, Prothonotary, Ovenbird, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded.  Other highlights included Northern Bobwhite quail, Wild Turkey and three vireos:  Red-eed, White-eyed, and yellow-throated.  Total species count for the days was 45 different species. 

 

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Great Dismal Swamp - 3/12/11

The Hampton Roads Bird Club visited the Dismal Swamp on March 12th, spending most of the time at the Washington Ditch and then a briefer time at Jericho Ditch.  The sun was shining, and there was only a slight breeze.  Members present were:  Jane Frigo, Bent & Laura Slaughter, Richard Hudgins, John & Marilyn Adair, Stuart Sweetman, Elisa Enders, Peggy Waterfield, George & Virginia Boyles, Dot Silsby, Mike Lowry, and Dave Youker.  The highlight was a huge flock of very vocal Rusty Blackbirds gathering in the upper levels of the trees along the Washington ditch.  Additionally, an American Woodcock was flushed along the boardwalk.  Total species count for the day was 40 different species.

 

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Mathews County - 2/19/11

On February 19th, we conducted our monthly field trip to Mathews County.  The trip started at New Point Comfort, and continued on to New Point Wharf, Horn Harbor Landing, Winter Harbor Landing, Bethel Beach, and ended with North and South Haven Beaches.  HRBC members included Lee and Meredith Bell, John and Marilyn Adair, Richard Hudgins, and Dave Youker.  The weather was warm, but there was a steady breeze that kept many song birds from making an appearance.  Total species count for the day was a respectable 48 given the conditions.  Complete list is below.

 

Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
American Oystercatcher
Great Blue Heron
Northern Gannet
Bald Eagle
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Surf  Scoter
Bufflehead
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Northern  Harrier


Red-tailed Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Brown Pelican
Forster's Tern
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring  Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Northern Flicker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Mourning Dove
American Crow
Northern Mockingbird
Carolina Chickadee
Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Meadowlark
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Carolina Wren
Dark-eyed  Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Tree Swallow
American Goldfinch
House Finch
Northern Cardinal
Robin
Common Grackle
Tufted Titmouse
White-throated Sparrow
Song Sparrow
House Sparrow
European Starling


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel - 1/15/11

We conducted our annual field trip to the CBBT islands on January 15th.  Twenty-one HRBC members visited all 3 islands of the CBBT and then continued on to the eastern shore for some more birding.  Highlights of the islands were all 3 Scoters, both Scaup, and Northern Gannets.  Additionally on island 3, there were 18 harbor seals basking on the rocks.  On the Eastern Shore, we came across a Eurasian Wigeon, Northern Pintail and American Woodcock.  A field of snow geese estimated conservatively around 500 contained 2 dark morph geese, and a flock of around 60 Canada geese contained 1 cackling goose.  We tallied a total of 68 species for the day.

 

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Hog Island - 3/13/10

Members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club visited Hog Island WMA on March 13 and tallied 70 species.  The forecast was for wind and rain, but it was a beautiful day with early clouds giving way to sunshine.  The highlights of the day were a nice flyby of an American Bittern, five sparrows, three wrens, both kinglets, and good looks at some baby Bald Eagles.  Complete list of species below.

 

Pied-billed Grebe
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
American Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Scaup (sp)
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Osprey
Bald Eagle


Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
American Coot
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren

Winter Wren
Marsh Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Palm Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Mathews County - 2/13/10

Eight members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club, along with three members from the Williamsburg Bird Club, braved the weather and birded along the shores of Mathew County for our February 13 trip. HRBC members included: Dave Youker, Jane Frigo, Elisa Enders, Susie Engle-Hill, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, George and Rosemarie Harris, and Richard Hudgins.

With a persistent wind and temperatures in the 30s, the group managed to spot 53 species. Areas covered were the shores near Bavon, Bethel Beach and North Haven Beach. Highlights included 50+ Tundra Swans, Common Goldeneye, American Pipit, and a lone Boat-tailed Grackle.

 
Mathews County

FIELD TRIP REPORT - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Island Tunnels & Eastern Shore - 1/16/10

A group of 35 birders got together on Saturday, 16 Jan to visit the CBBT islands and the southern end of the Eastern Shore.  Brenda Tekin joined members from the Hampton Roads and Fredericksburg Bird Clubs on what was a very pleasant January day. Island 2 was closed, so we spent the first part of the morning on islands 3 & 4 before continuing on to the Eastern Shore. 

At Kiptopeake, we ran into Will McPhail and other birders but no sighting of the common eider.  However, a peregrine falcon put on an aerial display toying with a group of rock pigeons.  That same playful nature didn't exist between a bald eagle and gull at Oyster, as the eagle snatched to gull out of the air.  Low tide at Oyster treated us to a diverse group of shore birds, as well as, a nice flyover by a large flock of tundra swans.  Total species count for the day was 78.

CLICK HERE to see some great photos of the birds and birders seen on the trip. Thannks to Hampton Roads Bird Club member Ken Lipshy for sharing these great pictures!.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Eastern Shore - 11/21/09

Members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club spent Saturday on the lower end of Eastern Shore and came up with 88 species.  The morning started with a stop at Island 1 where we had great looks at a common eider along with a great cormorant, purple sandpipers, northern gannets and the usual birds seen on the island.  We also got to observe the Coast Guard escorting a submarine through the bridge passage way.

The snow bunting at the Kiptopeke boat launch was very cooperative giving us plenty of photo opportunities.  Both black and surf scoters were present, as were common loons and red-breasted mergansers.  All three nuthatches were observed around the hawk watch platform.  A short stop at Cape Charles gave us the white-winged scoter and American oystercatchers.  We were also fortunate to see 6 dolphins swimming leisurely around the pier area.

The dowitcher, dunlin, black-bellied plover, willet, marbled godwit, oystercatchers, and the majority of our brant were seen on and around the mud flats at Oyster.  The day concluded with a beautiful sunset as we crossed back over the CBBT.

Snow Goose     148
Brant     280
Canada Goose     48
American Black Duck     2
Common Eider     1
Surf Scoter     15
White-winged Scoter     2
Black Scoter     11
Bufflehead     46
Hooded Merganser     1
Red-breasted Merganser  2
Red-throated Loon     1
Common Loon     16
Northern Gannet     4
Brown Pelican     28
Double-crested Cormorant  33
Great Cormorant     1
Great Blue Heron     2
Great Egret     2
Black Vulture     38
Turkey Vulture     24
Bald Eagle     8
Northern Harrier     5
Sharp-shinned Hawk     1
Cooper's Hawk     1
Red-tailed Hawk     5
American Kestrel     2
Peregrine Falcon     1
Clapper Rail     1
Black-bellied Plover     2
Killdeer     40
American Oystercatcher  32
Willet     3
Marbled Godwit     2
Ruddy Turnstone     12
Sanderling     38
Purple Sandpiper     28
Dunlin     12
Short-billed Dowitcher    2
Bonaparte's Gull     18
Laughing Gull     1
Ring-billed Gull     356
Herring Gull     12
Great Black-backed Gull  66
Common Tern     1
Forster's Tern     5
Royal Tern     1
Rock Pigeon     495
Eurasian Collared-Dove   2
Mourning Dove     138
Great Horned Owl     1
Belted Kingfisher     2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Northern Flicker     3
American Crow     28
Fish Crow     19
Tree Swallow     8

Carolina Chickadee     7
Tufted Titmouse     3
Red-breasted Nuthatch     3
White-breasted Nuthatch     1
Brown-headed Nuthatch     3
Carolina Wren     8
Winter Wren     1
Eastern Bluebird     37
Hermit Thrush     1
American Robin     22
Gray Catbird     3
Northern Mockingbird     4
European Starling     580
American Pipit     80
Yellow-rumped Warbler     136
Pine Warbler     1
American Tree Sparrow     2
Chipping Sparrow     2
Song Sparrow     8
Swamp Sparrow     1
White-throated Sparrow     7
Dark-eyed Junco     3
Snow Bunting     1
Northern Cardinal     6
Red-winged Blackbird     46
Eastern Meadowlark     4
Common Grackle     310
House Finch     2
American Goldfinch     12
House Sparrow     3


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Beaverdam Park, Gloucester - 10/10/09

The rain held off, and the birds were active during the early morning. The 12 members that traveled to Gloucester tallied 48 species. The area around the parking lot was particularly active with numerous sightings of Eastern Bluebirds, Eastern Phoebe, Pine Warblers and Chipping Sparrows. Waterfowl included Pied-billed Grebe, Ruddy Duck, Mallards and Mute Swans. On the trail, we had good looks for comparative purposes at both Gray-cheeked and Swainson’s thrushes.

We also got a close-up look at an adult Bald Eagle as it flew by us at the edge of the reservoir near the parking lot.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Greensprings Trail - 9/12/09

Memebers of the Club visited the Greensprings Trail in Williamsburg on Saturday morning, September 12. Highlights were more than a dozen Killdeer congregating on the nearby running track, and numerous sightings of both Pileated and Red-headed Woodpeckers. A total of 44 species were encountered.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - James River Park in Richmond - 5/16/09

We traveled to the Richmond area for our Club’s May trip to James River Park (42nd Street entrance) for a joint field trip with the Richmond Audubon Society, and RAS member Arun Bose as our guide. 20 + birders from Hampton Roads Bird Club, Richmond Audubon Society, and beyond attended the walk.

It was apparent many of the migrants from earlier in the week had cleared out, but we were still able to tally 68 species. 10 species of warbler present, with BLACKPOLL being the most numerous. Perhaps the highlight was being able to observe a pair of LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH attending an active nest. Nest sites of DOWNY WOODPECKER, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE also seen.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Great Dismal Swamp - 4/18/09

For our April field trip to the Great Dismal Swamp, we had 12 Club members participate. We explored Railroad Ditch in the AM and Jericho Ditch in the PM.

We tallied 69 species for the day, including 15 warbler species. Most abundant warblers were Prothonotary, Common Yellowthroat and Prairie (all seen and heard). We also heard many Ovenbirds, Louisiana Waterthrush, and Hooded warblers.
Other highlights included 4 vireo species (White-eye, Red-eyed, Yellow-throated and Blue-headed), Great-crested Flycatcher, Blue Grosbeak, Rusty Blackbirds and Northern Bobwhite.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Hog Island - 3/21/09

Fifteen members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club visited Hog Island for our March 21 field trip. Sunny skies and cool temps made for great birding conditions. Except for a very large raft of Scaup seen on the James River (too far away to determine which Scaup species), there was not a large number of waterfowl.

We spotted a BALD EAGLE on a nest and were excited to see it feeding one chick. Osprey are back in good numbers, and they were the only spring arrival we found. Pine Warblers were heard singing everywhere, and we got good looks at several of them. Also had great looks at both Kinglets and Brown-headed Nuthatches. A cooperative American Kestrel  let us get nice views through the scope.

We tallied 57 species for the day.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Hoffler Creek and Craney - 2/14/09

The Club visited Hoffler Creek Wildlife Preserve and Craney Island in Portsmouth for our February field trip. A nice variety of wintering birds was found at both locations. Hoffler Creek was very productive with a Snowy Egret and a group of at least 6 female Common Mergansers as the highlights. It was fun to watch a group of cooperative Green-winged Teal feeding along the edges of the marsh. Two Brown Creepers were spotted in the woods and multiple Pine Warblers were singing.

At Craney Island, an Osprey was perched on a platform on the Elizabeth River. Another unexpected bird was a Spotted Sandpiper foraging along the beach. Shorebirds included Dunlin, Western Sandpiper, Sanderling and a single Short-billed Dowitcher. Waterfowl included Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Horned Grebe and Red-throated Loon. Raptors did not disappoint, with a pair of Red-tailed Hawks, multiple Northern Harriers and an American Kestrel. 


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Islands - 1/10/09

2009 got off to a great start with the first field trip of the new year on January 10 to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel and the Eastern Shore.   

Highlights from the islands included thousands of Surf Scoters (mainly off of Island #2), hundreds of Long-tailed Ducks, and Eiders: 2 King and one Common off of Island #3, 2 King and 2 Common off of Island #4.  Other target birds such as Great Cormorant, Purple Sandpiper, Lesser Black-Backed Gull, Black and White-winged Scoter, and Greater Scaup were present in small numbers.

CBBT

The group then headed to several spots on the southern Eastern Shore.  At Eastern Shore of VA NWR we watched over a thousand Snow Geese fly over as well as Northern Shovelers, Black Ducks, and Gadwall in the pond on Ramp Road. 

CBBT

A visit to Oyster yielded a flyover flock of 30 Pipits at the landfill and the GLAUCOUS GULL was easily found on the "Billy Crystal" as previously reported. 

Scoping from the end of Magotha Road was productive with over a thousand Brant present and 7 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS soaring with Turkey Vultures above the builidings just to the north of this site. 

Wow!  78 species!!! 

A few other photos from the trip...

 

cbbt3
cbbt

 


Field Trip REPORT - Eastern Shore - 10/11/08

Nineteen members of our Club spent Saturday, Oct. 11, exploring the Eastern Shore for our October field trip. We tallied 91 species and were excited about the diversity of birds we saw in the different locations.

Even though it was windy at the Kiptopeke banding station, we saw several warblers - CONNECTICUT, BLACK-THROATED BLUE, OVENBIRD and AMERICAN REDSTART. We had a total of 12 warbler species for the day from all stops. Thanks to Lee Bell for capturing these photos at the banding station.

REVI WEVI

 

Red-eyes Vireo (L) & White-eyed Vireo (R)
   
BHB
Blackpollfall

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler (fall plumage)

Other highlights of the day included:

- Two immature BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and 34 WHITE IBIS, along with a lone PIED-BILLED GREBE at the pond on Ramp Lane

- An amazing number of Sharp-shinned Hawks, American Kestrel, and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Most of the Kestrels were seen in groups (one as large as 11) on Rte. 600 /Seaside Rd. between Oyster and Magotha Rd.

- First-of-Season Golden-crowned Kinglet, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, White-throated Sparrow and DE Junco

- A lone Ring-necked Duck,several American Black Ducks, immature Littler Blue Heron and Snowy Egret at the Oyster landfill (which is undergoing major construction but birders still have access)

- A large group of Marbled Godwit in Oyster, along with a few Lesser Yellowlegs and Willets

- A single Dunlin among Sanderlings and Ruddy Turnstones on the rocks off the beach in Cape Charles

- Fantastic looks at a stunning Peregrine Falcon flying fairly low at the end of Magotha Road.


Field Trip REPORT - York River State Park - 9/13/08

YRSP

On our field trip to York River State Park, we had 15 participants and tallied 55 species. It was a hot, humid day so bird activity dropped off later in the morning. Still, we had a great trip.

One surprise was that two of the most abundant species seen/heard were PINE WARBLER and WHITE-EYED VIREO, which were found in almost every area we explored.

Across from the entrance fee gate, we all had excellent looks at a YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER. Several people saw a B&W WARBLER and AMERICAN REDSTART there as well.

Other highlights included:
- all 6 species of our local woodpeckers
- 3 very active GREEN HERON, which flew together back and forth across Woodstock Pond several times
- SUMMER TANAGER and BALTIMORE ORIOLE females - beautiful colors in both
- a flyover group of 9 CEDAR WAXWING

Complete list of species and number of each follows.

Double-crested Cormorant   1
Great Blue Heron     2
Green Heron     3
Black Vulture     1
Turkey Vulture     4
Osprey     1
Bald Eagle     1
Clapper Rail     1
Killdeer     2
Laughing Gull     3
Ring-billed Gull     2
Royal Tern     2
Mourning Dove     6
Chimney Swift     2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird     1
Belted Kingfisher     3
Red-headed Woodpecker     4

Red-bellied Woodpecker     3
Downy Woodpecker     5
Hairy Woodpecker     1
Northern Flicker     2
Pileated Woodpecker     5
Eastern Wood-Pewee     2
Acadian Flycatcher     4
Eastern Phoebe     1
Great Crested Flycatcher     3
White-eyed Vireo     8
Red-eyed Vireo     3
Blue Jay     4
American Crow     5
Tree Swallow     10
Barn Swallow     2
Carolina Chickadee     5
Tufted Titmouse     7
White-breasted Nuthatch     2
Carolina Wren     10


Blue-gray Gnatcatcher     5
Eastern Bluebird     12
American Robin     6
Gray Catbird     2
Northern Mockingbird     1
Brown Thrasher     2
Cedar Waxwing     9
Yellow Warbler     1
Yellow-throated Warbler     1
Pine Warbler     13
Black-and-white Warbler     1
American Redstart     2
Summer Tanager     2
Eastern Towhee     1
Chipping Sparrow     8
Northern Cardinal     7
Baltimore Oriole     1
House Finch     10
American Goldfinch     4


Field Trip REPORT - James River Park in Richmond - 5/10/08

HRBC Group

 

On Saturday, May 10, 2008, eleven members of the Hampton Roads Bird Club met in Richmond to visit the 42nd Street section of the James River Park. 

Meredith and Lee Bell, Hilary and Michael Propst, Cathy and Terry Bond, Nick Flanders, Richard Hudgins, Eileen O'Toole, Julie Breeden and Jane Frigo joined the Richmond Audubon Society and were led by Arun Bose on an absolutely delightful morning walk. The weather was unusually cool and rain clouds threatened but didn't stop the walk.

 

71  species were listed, most of which were SEEN , rather than heard. Prior to our arrival, Blue-winged and Blackburnian Warblers were seen. After our arrival ten more warblers were seen including Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Yellow, Blackpoll and Black-throated Blues. Scarlet Tanagers were abundant. Red-eyed, White-eyed and Warbling Vireos were heard. 

After leaving 42nd Street, the HRBC members went to the Wetlands and added the Acadian Flycatcher, House Finch and had a great view of a Barred Owlet. What a wonderful trip! Our sincere thanks to Arun Bose and the Richmond Audubon Society for their hospitality!

A complete species list follows.

Barred Owlet
 

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Spotted Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Barred Owl
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Swainson's Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Magnolia Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Canada Warbler
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Towhee
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow


Field Trip REPORT - Great Dismal Swamp - 4/12/08

For the Hampton Roads Bird Club's April field trip, we visited two areas of the Great Dismal Swamp. We had a great turn-out with 25 participants and tallied 47 species for the morning.

gds1
GDS2

We started at Jericho Ditch, and as usual, the road in held many of the day's best species. Highlights included hearing a Louisiana Waterthrush, White-Eyed Vireo and Ovenbird, and seeing Prothonotary Warbler And Common Yellowthroat.

Many thanks to Great Dismal Swamp expert Don Schwab, who led our exploration of Jericho Ditch. We had great looks at Prairie Warbler (several were seen), Great-Crested Flycatcher, Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher and Prothonotary (they're abundant there now - Don said they'd just arrived 2 days ago). Also of interest were flyovers - Rusty Blackbird and Wood Duck.

On the main road to Washington Ditch we heard Eastern Meadowlark and saw Eastern Bluebird and Chipping Sparrow.

We walked the boardwalk at Washington Ditch and encountered a Red-Eyed Vireo. We heard two Hooded Warbler calling back and forth, and most of us saw a Northern Parula that was singing. Lee Bell saw a Ruby-Throated Hummingbird. We also got good looks at Overnbird and Prothonotary, which were both perched high and singing loudly.

zebra

Thanks to Harry Carlson for providing these photos of the trip, including this beautiful pair of Zebra Swallowtails.


Field Trip REPORT - Colonial Parkway - 3/15/08

On Saturday, March 15, 2008, the club met at the Yorktown Visitors Center to begin a field trip down the Colonial Parkway to Jamestown Island.  Those participating were Lee and Meredith Bell, George and Rosemarie Harris, Jim and Judy North, Tom and Gail Claydon, Phyllis Roth, Angie Herring, Nick Flanders, Eleanor Young, Fred Blystone, Ben Copeland, Dot Silsby, Julie Breeden, Mike Propst, Walter Livant and Jane Frigo.  Wind and showers were predicted but, although the early morning was cloudy, the day turned sunny, warm and beautiful!  We had good looks at ducks on the rivers--the best being a pair of Common Goldeneye, as well as six species of woodpeckers and a wonderful serenade by an Eastern Phoebe.  Spring appeared to be in the air as several species were seen collecting nesting material. A total of 73 species were identified. 

Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
American Black Duck
Mallard
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Kildeer

Sanderling
Laughing Gull
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Forster's Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


Field Trip REPORT - Greensprings Trail, Williamsburg - 2/23/08

Our field trip to Greensprings Trail began at 8 AM under cloudy, calm skies and cool, damp temperatures.

Lee and Meredith Bell, Cathy Bond, Julie Breeden, Libby Carmine, Ben and Mary Copeland, Nick Flanders, Jane Frigo, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, George and Rosemarie Harris, Barbara and Richard Hudgins, and Walter Livant met in the Jamestown High School parking lot where we saw Eastern Bluebirds, House Finches, Killdeer, and Ring-billed Gulls. 

GH Owl

The Nature Trail was quite productive, with a total of 47 species recorded. Some highlights included five Green-winged Teal, a fly-over group of 23 Snow Geese, an Osprey, Rusty Blackbirds in abundance, a long, close look at a Winter Wren, and best of all, a Great Horned Owl. 

Julie Breeden used her digital camera with Lee Bell's scope to take this photo of the owl. Here are a few other photos that Julie captured that day.

BrownCr
RHWP
Brown Creeper
Red-headed Woodpecker
   
wiwr
Grsprgrp
Winter Wren
Club members enjoying the birds

Field Trip REPORT - CBBT Islands and Eastern Shore - 1/12/08

CBBT

We had great weather and recorded 87 species of birds on our January field trip.

Read the full report HERE.


Field Trip REPORT - Mathews County - 11/10/07

The Hampton Roads Bird Club explored different parts of Mathews County for its monthly field trip on Saturday, NOV 10. Despite the rainy conditions the first hour of the trip, we had 17 enthusiastic birders and recorded 59 species for the day.

Mathews County is a small rural county on the Middle Peninsula, bordered on the west by Mobjack Bay and on the east by the Chesapeake Bay. Lots of water areas to check out, usually with lots of ducks during cold weather, but we had very few species on Saturday.

One of the many fabulous waterfront views in Mathews County
 

All of the locations we visited - and several more - are described at the the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries website for the Virginia Birding and Wildlife Trail.

We started at Bethel Beach (on the Chesapeake Bay side) at high tide, hoping to see Clapper Rails. We did hear several but never saw them. We got quite a show from several Forster Terns hovering over the marsh grasses, with Boat-Tailed Grackles and a Northern Harrier in the same area. On the beach were Dunlin, Black-bellied Plover and Sanderling, with Surf Scoters and at least one Black Scoter in the water and a Common Tern flying out over the water. Red-throated Loons and a Bald Eagle flew overhead.

Next we drove to Route 603, leading to the Mobjack Bay. Birds of note along the road included several Song, Swamp and White-throated Sparrows, Brown-headed Nuthatches, Killdeer, Pine Warbler and Red-tailed Hawk. One of the highlights in checking out the water was a group of 28 Common Loons! We also found Bufflehead, Ruddy Duck, Northern Gannet, Royal Tern and Brown Pelicans.

We stopped at New Point Comfort (the southern most tip of the county). We had a Common Tern there. We also had an amazing number of Tree Swallows, as least 2,000 in this location and several hundred in the other areas.

Our last stop was at New Point Wharf on Route 602. We didn't have any new species but we did see more Northern Gannets and Brown Pelicans.

Field Trip REPORT - Eastern Shore - 10/13/07

Check out the full report and lots of photos HERE.


Field Trip REPORT - York River State Park - 9/15/07

Eighteen people participated in the September field trip to York River State Park on Sat, 9/15, from 8 AM - Noon. We recorded a total of 48 species.

Trip leaders were Lee and Meredith Bell, and participants included: Ben and Mary Copeland, Nick Flanders, Jane Frigo, George and Rosemarie Harris, Angie Herring, Jim Harrison, Walt Livant, John Porter, Peter and Lorena Walsh, Dave Youker, and Eleanor Young.

On the way into the park we had a female Scarlet Tanager, White-eyed Vireo and a Northern Parula.

One of the most spectacular and memorable moments was when 5 adult Bald Eagles appeared in the sky at the same time. We also had one juvenile shortly before that.

As is often the case, the perimeter of the parking lot proved very fruitful. To name just a few, we had Hairy Woodpecker, American Redstart, Pine Warbler, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, and several Eastern Bluebirds. Chipping Sparrows were abundant.

Everyone had excellent looks at a Yellow Warbler and female Summer Tanager near the visitor's center. We also had two Empidonax Flycatchers that didn't vocalize so we weren't able to determine their species. A few of us birded a while after lunch and were rewarded with a Black & White Warbler and an early Hermit Thrush.

Thanks to Walt Livant for providing these photos from the trip!

Empidonax Flycatcher
Summer Tanager
Hairy Woodpecker
   
hamp