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Field Trips

 

This page contains reports of HRBC field trips conducted in 2014 and 2015.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Cumberland Marsh Preserve, Glenns Rappahannock Campus and the Naxera/Bryan Bay Site - 11/14/15 - Stuart Sweetman

The November field trip for the HRBC we tried something new by visiting what seemed to be promising spots of the Upper Peninsula. The group met behind the ranger station at the Newport News Park at around 7 am. We formed carpools and headed up I-64 for a 45 minute drive to our first stop up in New Kent county. We arrived at The Nature Conservancy's Cumberland Marsh Preserve around 8 am. This area is a freshwater tidal marsh and forest that buffers the wetlands of Holt’s Creek, which is part of the Pamunkey River. It has a small boardwalk that leads down to a viewing area that reveals the water and marsh. The water off the board walk yielded a few winter ducks such as Gadwall and Green-winged Teal. A pair of Red-headed Woodpeckers and low and close flyby of a Northern Harrier gave us all a thrill. We walked the wood line a short bit that only produced a few Kinglets and Titmice.

We next headed towards the town of West Point with its twin bridges that cross over the Pamunkey and Mattoponi Rivers. We stopped at a public boat landing that has a pier which overlooks the Mattoponi. We were hoping to get wintering ducks and Grebes from this spot but only a few Ruddy Ducks were seen. Too early in the year maybe for the ducks. We then drove to our second objective, Glenns Campus of Rappahannock Community College. Behind the college, there is a very nice wooded walking trail that leads to a secluded pond offering more opportunities for viewing woodland birds (and possibly ducks on the water). A few more Kinglets and a seemingly tame White-breasted Nuthatch walked head first down an oak tree to grab acorns off the ground right in front of us. We proceeded down the walking trail to the pond where we observed an adult Bald Eagle eating a fish in a pine tree on the edge of the pond. Not much happening in the woods so we walked back up to the parking lot where we decided to eat our lunch at the picnic tables the campus provides.

Our fourth stop was the Naxera/Bryan, Bay Site in Gloucester County. It’s a small state owned watercraft launch site, just up river from the mouth of the Severn River, which in turn is a small tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. The location is prime for wintering ducks as well as possible loons and grebes. This was another perfect spot for observing birds on the open water but they just weren't there. We did watch an enjoyable yet strange sight of a Bald Eagle and Black Vulture. The Eagle was playing/harassing the Vulture when all of a sudden the Eagle and Vulture locked talons and did the spinning maneuver that a breeding pair of eagles do during courtship. The Vulture broke loose and high tailed it in the opposite direction wondering what just happened. We left here and headed back towards route 17 and we were able to spot an American Kestrel on a power line where it was perched while hunting prey in the open fields.

While on our way down Route 17 heading back to Newport News we decided to stop at Gloucester Point Park that is basically under the Coleman Bridge. This park has a nice beach and a large fishing pier that extends out into the York River. This stop was actually the most productive stop of the day. Diving ducks, Horned Grebe and a cooperative Common Loon were there as well as Brown Pelican and Northern Gannet were working the river. Our biggest thrill at this spot was from a pair of Peregrine Falcons that were hunting the Rock Pigeons that were roosting under the bridge. One Falcon did a fly over literally twenty feet over our heads as he headed back to the bridge for another try at the pigeons. Over all it was a beautiful day to be out and we all had a great time but we all felt it might of been a little too early in the year for the winter ducks that all the water spots this trip has. We did manage 58 species for the day with 18 participants. A complete list of participants and species follows.

Photo by John Adair

Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Tom Charlock, John and Marilyn Adair, Pete Peterman, Lorrain Austin, George and Virginia Boyles, Mike Lowry, Bill Boeh, Walter and Gwen Harris, Harry and Rochelle Colestock and Nick and Elisa Flanders. Species list:

Canada Goose
Gadwall
Mallard
Green-winged Teal
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Red-tailed Hawk

American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Killdeer
Ruddy Turnstone
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Royal Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay

American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
European Starling
American Pipit
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Pine Siskin


FIELD TRIP REPORT - THE ESVNWR, Kiptopeke SP and Surrounding Areas - 10/17/15 - Stuart Sweetman

The October 2015 field trip of the HRBC was to the Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge and the surrounding areas of the lover Eastern Shore of Virginia. Our group of 14 participants assembled at the south toll plaza at 7am. It was a little chilly at the beginning but the sun warmed things quite nicely as the day went on. Our first stop was the walking trails of the refuge that leads down to the swamp overlook. We were able to spot a couple different Herons as well as Yellowlegs working the shore at low tide. We then headed over to the visitors center where the Yellow rumps were thick. A nice treat was at the giant Lantana bush behind the center which held numerous Monarch Butterflies backing in the sun and obtaining needed energy for their migration south. Next was Ramp Rd. and the public boat landing. The open skies of this area allowed up to see many raptor species of whice we had a total of 12 for the day. White Ibis were making flyovers as well as feeding in the pond along side Snowy Egret. A Tricolored Heron was working the marsh down at the boat slip. Our group assembled and headed to Magotha Rd to see what we could find down at the end of the road that looks out over Magotha Bay and the surrounding marsh. Forster's Terns were out over the water as well as a lone Common Loon.

Next was the public dump and waste transfer site which is located up Seaside Rd. in the town of Oyster. It is kinda bad to say but this location seemed to hold the most amount and diversity of bird species of any of our other stops. We got some early arrival winter ducks on the pond located on the site as well as the normal ruffians that call a dump their home; Gulls and Vultures which there must of been 25 Black Vultures within a stones throw. The highlight here were the Herons. Adult and Juvenile Little Blue Herons and many adult and juvie. Yellow-crowned and Black-crowned Night herons. The adults stayed in the trees as the youngersters hung out together on the opposite side of the pond. The excitement of the dump had to end as we headed over to Kiptopeke SP for lunch at the picnic tables.

Most of the group ate and rested up preparing for their departure home as the four diehards visited the hawk watching station and walked the wooded trails ending up at the old ferry landing which is now a boat landing and boardwalk with a fishing pier that looks out over the Chesapeake Bay. Many Gulls and Pelicans were in this area as well as the invasion of Yellow-rumped Warblers that have returned for the winter. The four lone adventurers left Kiptopeke for our drive back home. We could not end the day without stopping at the First Island of the CBBT that is open to the public. We added the resident Ruddy Turnstones and a wayward Flicker that must have needed a pit stop before continuing to the mainland. The group seemed to have a very enjoyable day and we ended up with 86 bird species for the day. A complete list of participants and species are to follow.

Photo by Dave Youker

Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Harry and Rochelle Colestock, Tom Charlock, Bill Boeh, Ellis and Wendy Maxey, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, Dave Youker, Peggy Rommen, Felicity Rask, John Ericson, and Anthony Nixon. Species list:

Common Loon
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Little Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Tricolored Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
White Ibis
Canada Goose
Mallard
Black Duck
Gadwall
Green-winged Teal
Ruddy Duck
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Osprey
Peregrine Falcon
Merlin
American Kestrel

Clapper Rail
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstones
Short-billed Dowitcher
Sanderling
Great Black-backed Gull
Herring Gull
Laughing Gull
Forester's Tern
Royal Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Tree Swallow
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse
Winter Wren
Carolina Wren
Marsh Wren
Northern Mockingbird
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
American Robin
Eastern Bluebird
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Cedar Waxwing
European Starling
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Meadowlark
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Northern Cardinal
House Finch
American Goldfinch
Eastern Towhee
Savannah Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Swamp Sparrow
Song Sparrow


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Hog Island WMA - 9/19/15 - Stuart Sweetman

The first part of our group met at Huntington Beach around 7am to make carpools for our trip to Hog island WMA in Surry County, Va. for the September 2015 field trip of the HRBC. We arrived at the Surry nuclear power plant check point for the routine inspection of personal and vehicles before gaining access to the island. The process usually takes about 20 minutes or so. We proceded to the island to join with other trip participants that had decided to drive to the island directly. Our group of 18 assembled at the first pull off along the first bodies of water which makes up the many of impoundments of the island. We did our customary meet and greet with a little birding thrown in before continuing down the gravel road. The majority of the overlook cutoffs are on the inside of the island looking out over the impoundment lakes but a couple look out over the James River where the group got good looks of soaring Bald Eagles and Palm Warblers working the shrub glass along the beach. Great and Snowy Egrets were seen in numerous places as well as intermittent calls of Sora Rails. We continued down the road to have our lunch and to take a break before the three mile walk through the woods and around Homewood Creek began. The White Pelicans were not in this year but a few hundred Caspian Terns were still using the exposed shoreline of the creek and the ample food source to be their staging area before heading south for the winter. A Tricolored Heron or two were seen from the backside of the creek as well as an abundance of ducks and shorebirds that had made their way into the area. We made our way back to the cars after an enjoyable day of birding the exclusive and unique area of Hog Island WMA. Our group managed 63 species for the day with everyone hot, tired and ready for a nap. The complete list of participants and bird species are to follow.

Photo by John Adair

Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Tom Charlock, Harry and Rochelle Colestock, Pete and Charm Peterman, John and Marilyn Adair, Jaques Van Montfrans, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jane Frigo, Geoff Giles, Mary Lynch, Andy Hawkins, Cheryl Jacobson, Inge Curtis, Lieve Keeney and Cathy Millar.

Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Tricolored Heron
Canada Goose
Mallard
Black Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ruddy Duck
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Osprey
Bobwhite
Clapper Rail
Sora
Semipalmated Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher

Semipalmated Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Laughing Gull
Royal Tern
Caspian Tern
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Pileated Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-headed Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern Wood Pewee
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren

Mockingbird
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
American Robin
European Starling
Black and white Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Summer Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
House Finch
American Goldfinch
Eastern Towhee
Grasshopper Sparrow


FIELD TRIP REPORT: Saturday, APRIL 11, 2015 - Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge

The April field of the HRBC was to one of our favorite spots in Hampton Roads for observing spring migration of birds to the area. The group of eighteen assembled at the parking area the end of Jerico Ditch road shortly before 8:00 AM to chilly temps. and overcast skies. We began our walk heading down the trail to the left from the parking area. The resident bird that always seems to be present this time of year is the beautiful Prairie Warbler. This species always seems to be the easiest one to see but White-eyed Vireos were also abundant. We walked down the trail until we almost reached the power lines. We were happy we did because a very vocal Hooded Warbler gave good looks as we walked back. Eleven Warbles species made the trip worthwhile. After Jerico we got in our cars and headed to Railroad Ditch on the way down to Lake Drummond. The gravel road down to the lake was narrow but worth the drive. We stopped a few times along the way to look and listen. The sun got brighter and the air got warmer but down by the lake was a beautiful place for us to enjoy our lunch. The area around the lake wasn't too birdie but we identified seven Sparrow species by this point. A few in our group had never seen Lake Drummond and were thrilled to see one of only a few natural fresh water lakes in the state. Everyone had an enjoyable day and we ended up with 66 bird species in the Dismal Swamp area. A complete list of participants and bird species are to follow.

Birders were: Stuart Sweetman, Tom Charlock, Dot Silsby, Katrina and Shawn Dash, Rochelle and Harry Colestock, Anthony Nixon, Virginia and George Boyles, Meredith and Lee Bell, Wendy and Ellis Maxey, Jane Frigo, Joyce and Hayes Williams and Peggy Rommen.

Species list for Dismal Swamp NWR on 4/11/15


FIELD TRIP REPORT: Saturday, MARCH 21, 2015 - Craney Island by - Stuart Sweetman

Our group of eighteen lined up in cars and trucks outside of the main gait of The Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area, 4599 River Shore Rd Portsmouth Virginia. The gate opened to the public at 8:00 am for our group to sign in for accountability purposes and to group up in carpools for less vehicle traffic. We finished the formalities required for the area and proceeded to the gravel road that encircles the three active impoundments which are only accessible by foot for those in our group. The weather started out cold but sunny. The air soon warmed and made enjoying the vast bird life much more enjoyable. Inside the impoundments held a combination of mud flats and still pond water. The mud flats held such niceties as American Avocets and a single Stilt Sandpiper, mixed in with Lesser Yellowlegs. The ponds held numerous Northern Shovelers and a few Green-winged Teals. Each impoundment held a great variety of both pond type ducks and shore birds. Along the outside of the gravel road was the James and Elizabeth Rivers which held their fair share of sea-going ducks including the treat of a single Male Eurasian Wigeon with his American cousins. A lone Female Common Merganser was quite out of place there but treated all of us none the less. We all birded the island till around 1pm with a few in the group picking up some great life birds. After checking out at the office a small group of five drove just down the street to Hoffler Creek park to see what woodland birds we could find. The weather turned out almost perfect and we tallied 83 species on this wonderful day. A complete list of participants and bird species to follow.

Island goers were: Stuart Sweetman, Walt Harris, Tom Charlock, Dot Silsby, Katrina and Shawn Dash, Windy and Ellis Maxey, Ned and Becky Rose, Marilyn and John Adair, Anthony Nixon, Marc Nichols, Ernie Miller, Jason Strickland, Andy Hawkins and Jane Frigo.

Bird species were:


FIELD TRIP REPORT: Saturday, FEBRUARY 14, 2015 - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Islands and Upper Eastern Shore - Stuart Sweetman

Our group of fifteen assembled at the south toll plaza of the CBBT at around 7:30 am to temps in the low 30's. Those of us whom have been on this trip in the past know what is in store when it is cold at the toll plaza. It means drop the air temp by 20 once we get to the open water of the tunnel islands. Our seven cars lined up behind our police escort and started our trip at 8am. I guess I didn't communicate clearly with our escort on the order of tunnel stops because we ended up starting at island #4 and worked our way backward. Regardless which island we started at we were still well rewarded with such highlights as Common Eiders, Purple Sandpipers and unforgettably close views of a group of five Harlequin Ducks in the sun about fifty feet from the railing off of island #3. All of the Islands were ice covered like Arctic glaciers but this didn't deter the resident Harbor Seals that have claimed islands three and four as their own. The whole group got an extra treat by an adult Bald Eagle that had been working the islands for the pasts few weeks feeding on gulls and no doubt a duck or two. Such an awesome sight seeing this majestic bird perched on the ice covered rocks. Three hours we spent at the tunnel islands when we headed North up route 13 to Willis Wharf. It didn't take us long to find what we made the drive for. A group of fifty to seventy-five Marbled Godwits were working the mud flats seen just behind the post office. Our group birded the wharf area when all of a sudden we were thrilled to see a thousand or more Snow Geese passing over in a dozen or so classic V-formations. We left Wills Wharf and headed back down 13 to Cape Charles Beach to see what was there. The temperature had risen to maybe forty degrees but the wind off the bay kept the air quite brisk. Three paraboarders were having fun on one side of the boardwalk as we watched a couple Bonaparte's Gulls on the other. We ended our stop at the beach and headed for a quick stop at island #1 of the CBBT for a pit stop and some quick birding. We were greeted by Ruddy Turnstones that have discovered public trash cans as easy pickings for a quick meal. A few more Harlequins were hanging out here but no odd ball gulls could be found among the many that have found refuge and quick handout from the tourists. We finished the wonderful day here with 67 species and I think 7 lifers for Bill Boeh. A complete participant and species list to follow.

Club Members were: Stuart Sweetman, Ken Lipshy, Gwen and Walter Harris, C.L.Tanner, Charm and Pete Peterman, Katrina and Shawn Dash, Jane Frigo, Andy Hawkins, Bill Boeh, Geoff Giles, Jessica Ausura-Rodgers and Ernie Miller.

Check out the great PHOTOS from the event!

Bill Boeh's album on our Facebook page

Ken Lipshy's album of birds and people

Species spotted were:


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Back Bay and False Cape State Park - 1/10/15 - Andy Hawkins

Twenty two club members braved temperatures in the upper twenties to low thirties to travel by open tram to False Cape State Park in Va. Beach Saturday, January 10th. Even though the temps were low, winds were low also, the sun was out and spirits were high. Highlights were hundreds of tundra swans and ducks, as many northern harriers as most of us had ever seen in one day, and snow geese seen at a distance. Hundreds of tree swallows flying in formation escorted us out of the park and put on quite a show. A coyote was spotted on the way in for a rare viewing. All and all a quality outing to an area not easily accessed. On the way to Little Island Park, Eurasian Collared Doves were spotted adding life birds for a few members. Photos by Andy Hawkins.

The group checking for birds on the beach

Northern Shoveler

Sanderling

Pete Peterman

Species spotted were:

Snow Goose
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe

Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
King Rail
American Coot
Greater Yellowlegs
Sanderling
Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Grandview Nature Preserve - 11/15/14 - Stuart Sweetman

Our group met at State Park Drive in Hampton to cold and windy conditions. Air temps. were in the forty's under cloudy skies. The group of 13 headed out to the beach and soon realized that its always a safe bet to drop the beach temp. by at least 10 degrees from what it was back at the road. That means it was COLD. The brisk wind limited the bird activity along the trail to the beach but slowly our numbers increased the further we walked down the beach. About half way down part of the group dropped off and headed back as the heartiest 8 of us made it down to the end where the channel is. By the time we got down to this point the wind had dried down and the sun brought the temp. up into the mid fifties. Shore birds were up and down the beach with great looks of Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers. Savannah Sparrows were numerous among the dunes at the North Point and at least one Ipswich Sparrow was found and photographed by Ernie Miller. The day turned out to be quite nice on the way back down the beach with sunny skies and just a slight breeze. Common Loons were fishing just 25 feet from shore and Forster's Terns were working the waves. For those of us that endured the five plus miles of walking we ended up with 47 species for the day.

Beach Goers were: Stuart Sweetman, Cindy Schulz, Jordan Hogg, Virginia Boyles, Pete Peterman, Bill Boeh, John Adair, Marilyn Adair, Angie Herring, Tom Charlock, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, Ernie Miller, and Jessica Rodgers.

Species List for field trip to Grandvidw Nature Preserve in Hampton (11/15/ 14 )

Canada Goose
Mallard
Surf Scoter
Black Scoter
Bufflehead
Red-breasted Merganser
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Black Vulture

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Black-bellied Plover
Semiplamated Plover
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Western Sandpiper
Dunlin
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Forester's Tern
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Flicker

Carolina Chickadee
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Savannah Sparrow
Ipswich Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Kiptopeke and Lower Eastern Shore - 10/4/14 - Stuart Sweetman

Our group met at the south toll plaza of The Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel at 7:00 am for one of our monthly field trips. This trip was Kiptopeke State Park and the lower Eastern Shore. We assembled into car pools by 7:30 for our trip to Kiptopeke. The weather started out cloudy with threats of drizzle but by 11:00 the sun was shining with the temperature rising to the upper seventies. We met at the parking lot at Kiptopeke to visit the hawk watching station and to hike around the trails there at the park. Warblers were scarce with only a single Ovenbird seen but raptors were well represented. Highlights at the park were excellent views of Coopers and Sharp-shinned Hawks. A Merlin gave a quick fly by caring a huge dragonfly for its breakfast. We then headed down to Sunset Beach for a look around. Gulls and Terns were seen off the beach out in the bay. Hawks were passing overhead and a low flyby of a Red Tailed Hawk gave good looks. Next we headed over to The Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuge where we got close looks of Peregrine Falcons and a pair of Broad-Winged Hawks were circling low overhead. The swamp overlook gave us Snowy Egret and an immature Yellow-Crowned Night Heron. Ramp Road we got great looks of White Ibis Seaside Sparrows and a Tricolored Heron was flying low over the marsh. The surprise bird was a couple of Common Nighthawks hunting for bugs out over the trees. A trip to Magotha Rd. produced a few Forster's Terns out over the point at the end of the road. A lone Eurasian Collared-Dove was seen in a driveway. The Final stop for the day was on the way back home where we stopped at first tunnel island pull off for a pit stop and to check out the rocks for birds. A small flock of Sanderlings flew past and a group of Ruddy Turnstones were found. Swimming along the rocks we were treated by four River Otters that seemed to be way out of place that far from shore. Our group had an enjoyable time and we ended up with 63 species for the day.

People list: Jane Frigo, Jason Strickland, Andy Hawkins, Stuart Sweetman, Katrina and Shawn Dash, Dot Silsby, Ellis and Wendy Maxey, Felicity Rask, John Ericson and Edie Bradburg.

Species list for field trip to Kiptopeke State Park and the lower Eastern Shore ( 10 / 4 / 14 )

Canada Goose
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Tricolored Egret
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
White Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon

Clapper Rail
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed
Caspian Tern
Forester's Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Common Nighthawk
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Black-and-white Warbler
Ovenbird
Seaside Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
Brown Pelican


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Hog Island and Ragged Island WMA's - 9/13/14 - by Stuart Sweetman

Our group of 9 club members met promptly at Huntington Beach to sunny skies. A quick head count was done and our 5 cars headed out for the 45 minute trip to Hog Island. Our trip took us past Smithfield through Isle of Wight county where a group of 6 Wild Turkey were spotted catching a quick breakfast in a cow pasture. Upon arriving at the island we met up with two other members bringing out total to 11. The security check in seemed to take forever but we finally made it in to begin our first field trip of the year. Pete Peterman and Andy Hawkins were the first two to arrive and they stated that spooked a roosting Great Horned Owl next to one of the observations points.

The group stopped at the beach access cut off to take a look at the beach and scan out over the James River. Bald Eagles were numerous there and at many spots along the way. The water was very high in the many lakes and ponds so migrating shorebirds were non-existent but we made up for it in migrating warblers with a total of 8 species, with the Yellow Warbler being the most abundant, giving us easy views at many locations throughout the day.

Photo of Yellow Warbler by Andy Hawkins

The group drove down to the visitors center at the end of the road for a quick break and a recharge of water and snacks before our three-mile walk around the northeast end of the island past Homewood Creek. The trail was nice and wide and provided easy access to viewing on both sides. Along the trail we stumbled upon a couple of snakes catching a few rays. One was a Black Rat Snake that seemed to freeze when we were checking him out. The other was a Northern Black Racer that was having no part of us looking at him. He took off like a shot and was gone in a couple seconds. We continues down the trail further where the species we were hoping to find was there for our enjoyment. The American White Pelicans that have been reported were still present. We counted 20 swimming near a sandbar out in the creek along side a hundred or more Caspian Terns. We continued around the back side of the creek for additional views of the pelicans. We continued to scope them when all of a sudden they took to the air. Such a huge and beautiful bird yet so graceful in flight. We thought they were heading out as they grew higher and higher but we later rediscovered them in a different part of the creek.

In a different creek we came across a young Tricolored Heron sitting up in a dead tree.He was a dead give away with that red neck and white stripe down the front. Out in a field we got good views of a lone Cattle Egret feeding in a patch of water. The whole group had an enjoyable and productive day totaling 77 species. A complete list of participants and bird species are listed below.

Participants from left to right: Elisa Enders, Nick Flanders, Phyllis Roth, Adam Bollinger, Pete Peterman, Jason Strickland, Angie Herring, Stuart Sweetman, and Jane Frigo

Photo of participants by Tom Charlock

Species list for Hog Island WMA and Ragged Island WMA (9/13/14):

 

Canada Goose
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
Double-crested Cormorant
American White Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Tricolored Egret
Cattle Egret
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Clapper Rail
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull

Caspian Tern
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Forester's Tern
Royal Tern
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Great Horned Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood Pewee
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren
Marsh Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Seaside Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
American Goldfinch


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Richmond's James River Parks - 5/19/14 - by Tom Charlock

A dozen HRBC birders left Tidewater at 7:00 AM on May 10 for Richmond’s fine James River Park system, approaching by a circuitous route to avoid a special downtown, mass running event. Seeking a alternate views and hearings of the season’s arrival of warblers, we’d driven well inland hoping that a fast-flow riparian environment, with its quick change in elevation over short distances, would deliver. It did. We observed 75 bird species, including 12 warblers. The showers that threatened all day mercifully restrained themselves once we’d arrived at each of the 3 parks we visited.

Our first stop was Reedy Creek, where we shared the car park with kayakers; and the steep, narrow, wooded Buttermilk Trail with joggers and mountain bicyclists. At our turn-around point, we trudged toward a multi-story steel tower, seeking its fine, top-of-canopy perspective of birds. While most were distracted with panting on up, Jane Frigo saw an Eastern Screech Owl just off our path, in the hollow of a deciduous tree. The sleepy Owl was most cooperative, dreamingly checking us out, right eye first, and then left. We returned to Reedy Creek by a different route, using a level dirt road, along which the vegetation was not as dense. The views of Chestnut-sided Warblers were much enjoyed. The group’s powers of concentration for warbler song – and patience for spotting them - then seemed at its peak.

Photo of Eastern Screech Owl by John Adair

The muddy wetlands to the east of Pony Pasture Rapids came next. A trailside drama marked our entry: Black Snake writhing up an old snag, much to the loud protest of Carolina Wrens, Northern Cardinals, and Carolina Chickadees. Must’ve been the end of someone’s nest. Other than mud and the drama, this stop had little to offer, except for repeated, excellent views of Indigo Bunting across an open meadow. The photo below shows how happy John Adair, Stuart Sweetman, Jane Frigo, Tracy Tate, Phyllis Roth, Sandy Robertson, Bill Ferris, Sandi DeCarlo, Dave Youker, Rexanne Bruno and Jason Strickland were to emerge from the muck that Tom Charlock led them into.

Photo of field trip participants by John Adair

Then came, from a trailhead by Riverside Drive and 22nd Street, an easy amble over boulders and a wood-surfaced foot bridge to historic and scenic Belle Isle. A Baltimore Oriole was seen. The fast flying insect eaters - Purple Martin, Tree Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow and Barn Swallow – came into view. Nest building by large numbers of Cliff Swallows (not typically seen in Tidewater) was very much in evidence, over the pedestrian suspension bridge connecting the north end of Belle Isle with downtown Richmond

Species list (75) for HRBC field trip to Richmond (5/10/2014):

 

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Wild Turkey
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Red-tailed Hawk
Virginia Rail
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Sanderling
Caspian Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech Owl
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Eastern Kingbird
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Swainson's Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
European Starling
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Eastern Towhee
White-throated Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

 


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Great Dismal Swamp- 4/12/14 - by Tom Charlock

Fifteen of us drove into the Jericho Lane entrance of the Great Dismal Swamp at 8 AM on April 12, 2014. It was about 60 degrees and later warmed into the 70s. Cloud cover was only light, bug cover was light, and so were the southerly winds. Seasonal green up seemed to advance by the hour. Some version of, “Lucky that we beat the leaf camouflage this year”, ran through various heads. The intersection of Lynn, Jericho and Hudnell Ditches was however disappointingly spare at first. A few of us mistook frog noises for the sound of Clapper Rail. Bill Ferris spotted three Wild Turkeys about a quarter mile to the south along Lynn Ditch; scopes showed a proud male in full display for hens, but air turbulence made it impossible to pick out his colors. Dot Silsby provided brief tutorials on the calls of the warblers that we heard - but for the most part they quickly hid from sight in the brush. It was only back at the ditch intersection that a Prairie Warbler finally both sang and posed steadily close by, allowing spectacular views through a telescope.

A distant Northern Harrier heralded our approach to Washington Ditch. The trees at the border of the Swamp rang like the jackpot of the warbler lottery. Black and White, Prothonotary and Northern Parula, and others revealed their places in the canopy, flew off, and then courteously returned. We were thus quite optimistic at the prospect of a similar performance when starting on the nearby boardwalk, but there saw little beyond a Black Snake and Painted Turtle. Nearing the end of the boardwalk, Stuart Sweetman and Jane Frigo led half of the group on a full reverse march; the others pressed on toward Washington Ditch itself. About 15 minutes later, excited gestures and waves from the “others” brought the reversers to their grand find, a cluster of tall trees just south of the Ditch bearing cooperative Hooded , Black and White, and Prothonotary Warblers, and Common Yellowthroats. We enjoyed the best views and calls of the day. Apparent moral of story: spend time at the very borders of Swamp, avoid boardwalk, and focus on the elevated roadway along Washington Ditch itself.

Photo from the interior of the Great Dismal Swamp showing, from left to right, Bill Ferris, Libby Carmines, Stuart Sweetman, Paul Roth, Lorraine Austin, Phyllis Roth, Michelle Scott, Jane Frigo, Sandy Robertson, Dot Silsby, Bill Boeh, Joyce Williams, Mike Lowry, and Hayes Williams (Tom Charlock not in picture).

Species list (58):

 

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Wild Turkey
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Laughing Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Great Crested Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush

Black-and-white Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Dutch Gap and Malvern Hill - 3/15/14 - by Tom Charlock

Our field trip to Dutch Gap Conservation Area in Chester on March 15, 2014, served, in a manner of speaking, as a preface to future enjoyment. Ownership of that land has been usurped multiple times, residents and grounds have been alternately set to good purpose and ravaged, but contemporary environmental mitigation has given us a place to reflect on nature - and experience some fine birding. Most of us drove past the belching Chesterfield Power Station intending to first park in the lot for the Citie of Henricus (aka Henry, Prince of Wales and son of King James), a representation of the circa 1611 English settlement. We were waylaid enroute by the attentions of two other bird clubs which had stopped at a surprisingly idyllic wetland to view Eagle, numerous Coots, Shovelers and Widgeons, and a beaver lodge. Walt Harris’s photo from the wetland (formerly the main channel of the James River, mostly filled by industry in the 20th century) follows.

American Coot and Northern Shoveler at Dutch Gap by Walter Harris

Reaching the intended starting point for our walk, a great, steep, fenced Mount Trashmore-like mound loomed nearby as an ugly distraction. Seeking exhilaration by bird rather than landscape, Dave Youker and Bill Boeh insisted on scrambling up; their followers were rewarded as they saw Ring-necked Duck, Buffleheads, more Northern Shovelers and Canada Geese in the flyash pond at the top. We next covered a mile of Dutch Gap’s four-mile trail. Sycamore Spur provided a long vista of muddy flats and the original river channel; Jane Frigo, Virginia Boyles and John Adair deliberated on whether telescopes revealed Short-billed Dowitcher or Wilson’s Snipe – and decided on both. Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal were seen before we returned to the visitor’s center for lunch. We’d also heard and seen Pine Warbler and Ruby-crowned Kinglet on the way back. The lunch picture has John Adair, Bill Ferris, Pete and Charm Peterman, Marilyn Adair, Dave Youker, Virginia Boyles, Tracy Tate, George Boyles, Bill Boeh, Jane Frigo, and Phyllis Roth (missing Walt and Gwen Harris and Tom Charlock).

Our party did not view the actual James River “Gap”, which was begun by the labor of Union colored troops hoping to pioneer a route free from Confederate batteries. Bird loving took us to another Civil War site, Malvern Hill, downstream and further north. Malvern Hill has mile-long stretches of field that are completely clear of trees. As predicted, the wind had picked up; and there we saw little. A Northern Harrier at low level lifted group morale. The mercury was now pushing 70 on this partly cloudy day. Slowly walking along the border of a field, Tracy Tate and Dave Youker called out a Horned Lark; perhaps they were soon silently snickering while the “more challenged of us” responded by fruitlessly chasing through sharp crop stubble for a solid look at the persistently evasive creature.

Species list (57) for Dutch Gap and Malvern Hill (3/15/14):

 

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Ruddy Duck
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier

American Coot
Killdeer
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
Ring-billed Gull
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Fisherman's Island and Kiptopeke State Park - 2/15/14 - by Tom Charlock

Picture by Walt Harris

A skeleton crew of 3 HRBC members (Gwen and Walt Harris, Tom Charlock) and 2 guests (Tracy Tate and Rexanne Bruno) drove northwards on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel (CBBT) for an 8:30 AM meeting at the Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuge (ESNWR) with Ranger Jennie Lewis and volunteer naturalist guides Jack and Judy Humphreys. We had arranged for special access to Fisherman’s Island at the northern terminus of CBBT; and the official National Weather Service (NWS) forecast called for a special greeting of steady precipitation that morning. At the bridge to Fisherman’s Island a different greeting appeared: A stout Peregrine Falcon on the railing, feathers puffed out to deal with the stiff breeze of a cloudy day in the 30s. And there was no rain at first. Few birds could be seen in the large swamp on the northwest portion of the Island; the same for shore birds on the southern beach (it was near high tide). But Fisherman’s Island presented us with the morning of the Bald Eagle, both mature and immature; it was they who observed us, as we walked eastwards along the shore. Walt photographed an adult near the base if the bridge. The shy bird flew as we approached, even though we were quite distant. Closer examination revealed the carcass of a White Winged Scoter (with stomach intact) which the Eagle had been eating. At about noon, just as we departed the Island, the rains finally arrived. Gwen and Walt left.

Tracy and Rexanne (who lives here but still writes a newsletter for the Lynchburg Bird Club) are skilled and intrepid birders. “Onward and upward.“ And so it was for a total of 60 species. We saw a Common Goldeneye near the boat ramp of ESNWR – and numerous flitting Yellow-rumped Warblers (plumage as varied as ever) on the road nearby. A stop at the Kiptopeke waterfront provided the party with good doses of cold wind and rain in the face. Optics or no optics, it was hard to confidently identify, in such conditions, the rafts of hundreds sea ducks that so enjoyed this weather; the rascals kept their distance. On Route 600, the sky did provide some short intervals of surprisingly good lighting; one was just right for a ground-perched Red-shouldered Hawk, lifting its wings slightly and displaying more color than found in Sibley’s. A Willet was seen at Oyster. The day’s birding ended a little after 3:36 PM on CBBT Island 1, where the instruments recorded gusts to 46 mph. That’s just 1 mph below Beaufort Scale 9, a strong gale, which can blow over small trees – but not Island 1’s Purple Sandpipers and Ruddy Turnstones.

Species list:

 

Snow Goose
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Widgeon
American Black Duck
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Greater Scaup
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Common Loon
Northern Gannet

Double-crested Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
American Oystercatcher
Willet
Ruddy Turnstone
Purple Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon

Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle


FIELD TRIP REPORT - CBBT Islands and Cape Charles - 1/11/14 - by Tom Charlock

Pictured above (left to right) are some of the participants who did island birding in the wind and mist: Geoff Giles, Gwen Harris, Jane Frigo, and Walt Harris

Our party of 15 drove northward along the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel (CBBT) with the required paid police escort shortly after 8 AM on Saturday, January 11, 2014. It was solidly cloudy, but the temperature was in the 50s, and quite an improvement from last year’s frigid expedition to the same non-public CBBT islands. On this our most recent visit, Norfolk set a record of 1.27 inches for rainfall as a cold front approached; southwesterly winds peaked at 47 mph by the airport; mini-fronts of fog swept over the Bay waters, alternately obscuring and then opening our visibility. But we still netted 61 species for the day. Alternating sessions of observing on the CBBT islands with sheltering from wind and spray by the walls of tunnel blockhouses, we saw “all three” Scoters, both Greater and Lesser Scaup, Long-tailed duck, and Black-capped Petrel. At one point, a subset of no more than 4 birders could be coaxed out to pose for a photo. While formations of Northern Gannet did not mind the weather, several of us reported that all of the action appeared to reduce the physical size of these large birds; quite an illusion. Harbor seals on the rocks easily masqueraded as the same. One large seal repeatedly surfaced and stared at Geoff Giles, perhaps in sympathy for the responsibilities that he will face while leading the Williamsburg Club this year.

After 3 hours in island world, we took a breather by the visitor’s center at the tip of the DelMaVa peninsula. Some of us sissies headed straight to Sting Ray’s Restaurant; the brave continued at Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuge and were rewarded with the sound of a Clapper Rail. Most reconvened at the Cape Charles beach to enjoy Bufflehead and Red-breasted Merganser. There the long pier also provided a fine mammalian, rather than avian, sight: a school of dolphins at close range herding fish towards the inner harbor. Washington Avenue was a worthwhile stop. Mike Lowry’s car reported Ring-necked Ducks and Redheads at Lack Foster by Fig Street on the way to King’s Creek Marina, where a Northern Mockingbird put on an especially good act. As it warmed to the low 70s with ominous clouds in view to the southwest, Adam Bolinger advised us of an official Tornado Watch, and the remaining group headed towards home.

People list: Mike Lowry, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, Jane Frigo, Rosemarie Harris, George Harris, Geoff Giles, Adam Bollinger, Gwen Harris, Walt Harris, Stuart Sweetman, Hayes Williams, Joyce Williams, Dot Silsby, Jason Strickland, and Tom Charlock

Species list:

 

Canada Goose
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Green-winged Teal
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Black-capped Petrel
Northern Gannet

Double-crested Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Clapper Rail
American Coot
Semipalmated Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Purple Sandpiper
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Eastern Kingbird
Blue Jay
Carolina Chickadee
Carolina Wren
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal


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